up home page bottom

Add a comment Bookmark

Site Email Pictures Postcard

headermask image

header image

Brooklyn Pizza :: Tucson, Arizona and a Look at Our Use of Resources

PizzaThere’s a pizzeria on 4th Street that’s making more than Brooklyn-style pies.  Brooklyn Pizza Company is making it’s own electricity with over 46 solar panels on the building’s roof.  The energy generated is large enough to run the restaurant’s power, including the coolers.

When you walk into Brooklyn Pizza Company, you are greeted by a flat screen television to the left displaying the current energy production, energy usage, and total output for the day.  According to the Brooklyn Pizza Company website, the panels generate 24,500 kWh of electricity per year.

The pizza was pretty good too – the crust had a thick, chewy rim, and the inner crust was thin and crispy.  We ordered the Florentine, which was loaded with mozzarella, tomato, spinach, oil, vinegar, black pepper & fresh basil.

Nick campingAfter seeing Brooklyn Pizza Company’s energy stats, we wanted to see just how sustainable our way of life has become.  Yes, we use a lot of gasoline driving from one place to the next, but life on the road limits the majority of our water and electricity uses.  Here is the breakdown based on our trip so far (while this does not account for overnight stays with friends and restaurant use, it at least is a ballpark figure for our energy consumption).  My figures are compared to what the average American uses per year.

TOTAL GAS FOR THE YEAR: 2,260.2 gallons (for the both of us)
Total gas used for the past 2 months: 376.7 gallons
x 6 = 2,260.2 gallons per year

FOR THE AVERAGE AMERICAN:
TOTAL GAS FOR 2 PEOPLE: 2,044 gallons a year
1,022 gallons per year per person
2.8 gallons per person, per day
(2.8 x 365 = 1.022)
(http://askville.amazon.com/barrels-oil-day-average-American/AnswerViewer.do?requestId=728700)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

WATER USAGE: 1,095 gallons of water a year (for the both of us)
3 gallons a day
3 x 365 = 1,095 gallons of water a year

FOR THE AVERAGE AMERICAN:
WATER USAGE FOR 2 PEOPLE:
58,400 gallons per year
29,200 gallons per year
The average American 80 and 100 gallons of water a day.  I am going with 80 a day since I know we use less than the average American.
(80 x 365 = 29,200)
(http://www.idealbite.com/tiplibrary/archives/suds-efficient-dish-washing)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ELECTRICITY: none (all is powered by the car, which utilizes gas as it’s source of power).

FOR THE AVERAGE AMERICAN:
ELECTRICITY:
In 2007, the average monthly residential electricity consumption was 936 kilowatthours (kWh). (http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/ask/electricity_faqs.asp)
For two people: 1,872 kWh
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

TOILET PAPER FOR THE BOTH OF US: 5,110 squares a year
about 7 squares a day (7 x 365 = 2,555) x 2 people: 5,110
I use a handkerchief that I wash out everyday for urine, and Nick of course does not use toilet paper after urinating, so our TP usage is pretty limited.

FOR THE AVERAGE AMERICAN:
TOILET PAPER FOR 2 PEOPLE:
40,000 sheets a year
The average American uses over 20,000 sheets of toilet paper a year. (http://joshmadison.com/article/toilet-paper-usage-analysis/)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Camping in MississippiAccording to these very general calculations, our camping lifestyle is a much more sustainable way to live. This is no surprise to me.  I have noticed my tendency to save resources while camping – I use very little water to wash my face and dishes, have no electronics constantly utilizing power, and I build a campfire if it is cold.  Its easy use massive amounts of water through a faucet, and to rack up on energy use through lights, air conditioning, and appliances.

If you liked my post, feel free to subscribe to my rss feeds

One Comment

  1. that ain’t no brooklyn pizza!!

    1. Boo Shankly on May 11th, 2009 at 7:34 pm

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*